hxngover

10 Old Fashioned Dating Habits We Should Make Cool Again

  • 1. Coming to the door to pick someone up.
  • 2. Trying to dress really nicely for a date.
  • 3. Bringing flowers or other tokens of affection to the first date.
  • 4. Going dancing that’s not grinding on a grimy club floor.
  • 5. Straightforwardly asking someone out and not calling it “hanging out.”
  • 6. Additionally, being clear about when you’re “going steady.”
  • 7. Romantic gestures like writing poems.
  • 8. Turning electronics off and just being with one another.
  • 9. The general concept of asking permission for things.
  • 10. Not assuming sex is to be had at any point in time.
  • by Kate Bailey
iluminacje
femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
Looking at the precision of even the tiniest details in this painting—the chips in the individual stones of the chapel, the leaves of the plants that grow here and there from the tops of the walls, the little flashes of light from unexpectedly angled surfaces in the stone—it isn’t surprising to learn from the Metropolitan Museum that “Daguerre had been searching since the mid-1820s for a means to capture the fleeting images he saw in his camera obscura, a draftsman’s aid consisting of a wood box with a lens at one end that threw an image onto a frosted sheet of glass at the other.”
Of course, the Met meant that he captured those fleeting images by inventing what the Encyclopedia Britannica dubs “the first practical process of photography, known as the daguerreotype.”
But in this circa 1824 oil painting, The Ruins of Holyrood Chapel, it seems that he already had.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

Looking at the precision of even the tiniest details in this painting—the chips in the individual stones of the chapel, the leaves of the plants that grow here and there from the tops of the walls, the little flashes of light from unexpectedly angled surfaces in the stone—it isn’t surprising to learn from the Metropolitan Museum that “Daguerre had been searching since the mid-1820s for a means to capture the fleeting images he saw in his camera obscura, a draftsman’s aid consisting of a wood box with a lens at one end that threw an image onto a frosted sheet of glass at the other.”

Of course, the Met meant that he captured those fleeting images by inventing what the Encyclopedia Britannica dubs “the first practical process of photography, known as the daguerreotype.”

But in this circa 1824 oil painting, The Ruins of Holyrood Chapel, it seems that he already had.